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Construction Zone Ahead

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  Almost all of the furniture is out of the saloon. All of the fuel and water tankage has been removed. We will be replacing the rotten water tanks. After we clean 43 years of schmoo out of the bilge. Then we fair and paint the hull and bilge. We will replace the old stainless steel water tanks with flexible tanks. Why flexible tanks? So that we don't have to tear apart the boat again if a tank fails. Like a NYC street when it rains, the schmutz in the bilge makes a muddy paste when cleaner touches it. The experience is just as disgusting as it sounds. "Why does the picture of your saloon look weird?" It's a 3D model built up from many photographs ( photogrammetry ). If you care to install Blender  (it's free, open source software), I'll send you the model so you can "walk" through the boat for yourself. Also, if you own a Formosa 46, the model may be useful for your own design work. Ultimately, the entire boat will be modeled in Blender and Invento

Galley Remodel Part 1: Emily The Destroyer

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Original galley: too small, inefficient use of space Kill all the foam! We decided last year that we wanted to move and expand the galley. We also planned to replace the existing wiring and plumbing throughout the boat, so we knew all of the current infrastructure had to go. Over the summer, Emily started hacking away at the galley, removing a pickup truck load of foam insulation from the old refrigeration compartments. So much foam! 8 layers of 2" thick foam under each refrigeration box and 2-6 layers on each side. Forty years of water damage had worked some evil on the plywood sink surround, but the cabinet face and drawers were still solid. The drawback to all that hardwood cabinetry? It was built to stay there forever, solidly glued and nailed, thus no small feat to extract.  Previous owner covered the water damaged wood backsplash with plastic laminate. The cabin sole is 3/8" of teak and holly, glued onto 3/8" of marine plywood, which is in turn glued onto the floo

Back in the Reading Groove

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After two years away from the bookstore, I finally fell back into reading every day in 2021. As of October 1, I had over 60 books under my belt this year. Audiobooks make up the bulk of them because I can work on noisy and/or mindless boat projects and read at the same time.  This list includes every book I finished this year, in order of completion. I often have more than one book going at a time. Sometimes I'll download the library e-book of something I'm reading in paper so I can carry it with me or read in bed without turning on the light.   I enjoyed some of these more than others, but all of them were worth seeing through to the end.  Reminder! libro.fm sells DRM-free audiobooks and supports the independent bookstore of your choice. Buying through them means a portion of your purchase price stays in your community, and another portion supports a small company in Seattle. Subscription is the way to go, but you can also buy individual titles without a membership. Scamazon

Our Highly Opinionated Restaurant Guide

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"Where should we eat?" This question recently prompted a firehose of recommendations via text. Spreadsheet to the rescue! Most places on the list are in Puget Sound, but there are a few entries for Las Vegas, Portland, and other cities. Our favorite grocery stores and other markets for comestibles are also included. Have we missed your favorite place? Want to know if we've tried something? We are always happy to share our opinions about food and drink! World class lamination at Saboteur Bakery in Bremerton, WA.

Hello Port Townsend!

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  Getting towed to Port Townsend for haulout Coming into Port Townsend mid-evening We are onto the next stage of getting ready for the next stages. Cascadia  is in Port Townsend awaiting haulout. We will be in Boat Haven to finish re-powering, re-wiring, re-rigging, re-modeling, re-everything-ing.  Port Townsend and Boat Haven are more amazing than we ever imagined. As we were getting towed into dock, we were greeted by loads of boat tenants, invited to check out their similar installations. And then, two slips away was another Formosa 46, SV Grace !  We will be landlubbing for the next six months, so that we can tear into boat projects without having to worry about clearing a space to cook dinner and sleep. Stay tuned...

Random Recipe: Green Chili

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Decades ago, as a ski bum in Colorado,  I cooked breakfast at the Crooked Creek Saloon ("Eat  'til it hurts,  drink 'til it feels better").  I ended most shifts with an enormous breakfast burrito,  and to this day I veer toward the breakfast burrito on almost any menu. I always hope to encounter a magical mountain of crispy griddled red potatoes, scrambled eggs, and savory black beans, wrapped in a tortilla and smothered in green chili,  melted cheddar,  sour cream,  and guacamole.  Like most food memories,  this one is intertwined with my nostalgia for that place and time; it exists only in my brain, forever out of reach. This green chili only vaguely resembles the vegetarian version we served there,  but it scratches the itch for me.  I have no idea how this compares to any other green chili, authentic or not,  but it was delicious.  I'm putting it here because I'll want to make it again.  Vegetarians could substitute corn and summer squash for the pork. Jus

Actual Engine Removal

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Here's where things get interesting. This is Part 3 of our engine removal. Another way to preface this is: "If it ain't one thing, it's every other damned thing." Part 1: Towards Electric Drive Part 2: Removing a Large Engine While in the Water Surprise! Churn What I Would Have Done Differently The gantry has proven itself well. It pulled everything thus far with no creaks or groans. Now to test lifting the engine! Here we are testing it all out. No groans or creaks. The gantry is solid and performing as expected. Surprise ! And then... this. Well. Shit. The crack doesn't look so bad because the engine has been put back down on the stringers. We overbuilt the gantry beam. Two 2x6 fir beams should have been sufficient, so of course we used two 2x8 beams through-bolted so they behave as one beam. It turns out that materials capacity tables can't take into account defective materials. One of the 2x8 beams snapped at a knot on the bottom of the board. Fortunat